Research

JCOIN includes 13 clinical research centers (“Research Hubs”), that are studying evidence-informed approaches to ensure quality care is provided to individuals with opioid use disorder in justice settings, and two resource centers that conduct complementary studies and provide supportive infrastructure: the Coordination and Translation Center (CTC) and the Methodology and Advanced Analytics Resource Center (MAARC).

JCOIN Studies

Browse JCOIN studies by status, type, setting, institution, keywords, and other filters.

Publications Library

Browse JCOIN articles, protocols, presentations, and more.

Research Translation

Breakdowns of research regarding substance use disorders within health and justice settings.

JCOIN Studies

Each JCOIN study brings researchers together with justice and health stakeholders in five or more communities to address gaps in opioid use disorder treatment and related services. Their work engages a wide range of justice settings, including jails, prisons, community corrections, problem-solving courts, and juvenile justice agencies. The studies evaluate behavioral interventions, digital therapeutics, comprehensive patient-centered treatments, and delivery of medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) throughout the United States.

In 2018-2020, JCOIN supported 15 accelerator supplement projects, which included short-term studies and surveys.

Browse all or use the filtering tools below for more information about JCOIN studies.

  • Reset Filters

Identifying MOUD Decision-Making Factors in Criminal Problem-Solving Courts (058)

Principal Investigator(s): Barbara Andraka-Christou

Medications for opioid use disorder (MOUDs), especially opioid agonists (i.e., buprenorphine and methadone), are the gold standard of care and can decrease mortality risks for people with OUD by 50%. However, a nationwide study found that fewer than one in 20 problem-solving courts refer participants to MOUD and some courts ban participants from MOUD utilization….

Learn More...
University of Central Florida logo

Improving Low Threshold Naloxone on Release from Incarceration (057)

Principal Investigator(s): Peter Davidson

The primary aim of this study is to determine if providing high-volume, low-threshold, naloxone-on-release is effective at placing naloxone in the hands of jail releasees most likely to experience or witness an overdose. Two secondary aims are to determine facilitators and barriers to releasees obtaining additional doses of naloxone in the community after release, and…

Learn More...
University of California San Diego logo

Ending Self-Stigma for Justice-Involved Populations being Treated with MOUD (056)

Principal Investigator(s): Michael Gordon

This project adapts an intervention called Ending Self-Stigma (ESS), which has shown promising results in two large randomized controlled trials. The adapted intervention, called Ending Self Stigma: Medications for Justice-involved Populations (ESS-MJP), incorporates a psychosocial intervention directly addressing problematic anticipated stigma and internalized stigma around the use of Medications for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD). This…

Learn More...
Logo of Friends Research Institute (FRI)

Real Time Data on Post-Release Mortality (055)

Principal Investigator(s): Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Rosemarie Martin

Numerous studies have documented an increased risk of mortality following release from prison. However, considerable lags exist between the time that a death takes place and when cause of death information is reported in State Vital Records. Reporting delays prevent health departments from being able to proactively respond to public health emergencies as they arise….

Learn More...
The logo of Brown University/

Evaluation of a Novel Continuity of Care Model for Offenders with SUD (054)

Principal Investigator(s): Valerie Hardcastle

This study proposes the first rigorous examination of a novel continuity of care model (called CCDAT) that extends from detention through probation. The project will assess the effectiveness of the CCDAT program in promoting detainee recovery and its impact on recidivism, by examining the level and type of substance misuse and the psychological and social…

Learn More...

Reducing Stigma Among Individuals with Addiction and Staff in the CJ System (053)

Principal Investigator(s): Kelly Moore

This project addresses stigma associated with addiction, MOUD, and criminal involvement in the CJ system. It draws upon existing evidence-based interventions to develop a multi-level stigma intervention, Combatting Stigma to Aid Re-entry and Recovery (CSTARR), that simultaneously targets CJ staff attitudes as well as CJ-involved individuals’ ability to cope with stigma. The study uses a…

Learn More...
East Tennessee State University Logo

Community Participatory Research on Veterans in Specialized Programming (052)

Principal Investigator(s): Faye Taxman, James Byrne

The Veteran’s Administration has responded to the vast needs of justice-involved veterans through the Veteran’s Justice Program (VJP), which includes both the Veterans Justice Outreach (VJO) program and the Health Care for Re-Entry Veterans (HCRV) program. The Veterans Justice Outreach program provides Veterans Justice Outreach (VJO) Specialists to coordinate service delivery for justice involved veterans;…

Learn More...
GMU UMASS Lowell logo

Measuring Community Vulnerability to COVID/OUD (051)

Principal Investigator(s): Marynia Kolak

The COVID-19 pandemic has created many additional challenges for patients with opioid use disorder, including disrupted treatment and support systems, mental health issues related with social distancing, as well as increasing financial and economic stressors. Applying a racial, social, and spatial equity lens, this project first develops a new COVID-19 community typology measures considering county…

Learn More...
Logo of The University of Chicago

Understanding Perceptions, Barriers and Facilitators for COVID-19 Vaccination among Detention-based Healthcare Workers in 8 States (050)

Principal Investigator(s): Bruce Taylor

Correctional medical staff have been on the front lines of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Medical staff working in prisons and jails are responsible for providing healthcare in very challenging correctional environments. As county jails have been among the hotspots for COVID-19 related outbreaks, it is imperative to better understand perceptions of COVID-19 related risk, experiences…

Learn More...

A Statewide Evaluation of the Implementation of Medications for Opioid Use Disorder in Vermont Correctional Facilities and the Impact of COVID-19 (049)

Principal Investigator(s): Elias Klemperer

Through the NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program, Yale University received a supplement to support a study to increase the reach, access, uptake, and impact of COVID-19 testing and to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 among incarcerated people and corrections staff. The initiative’s multidisciplinary team will be working with jails and prisons across Florida, Rhode Island, Minnesota, and Washington to address the urgent need for the development and implementation of long-term COVID-19 testing and prevention strategies. The long-term goal is to mitigate the impact of  COVID-19 in correctional facilities while considering the ethical issues that must be addressed to optimize implementation and effectiveness.

Learn More...

Teleservices in Judicially Led Diversion Programs: The Impact of COVID-19 on the Adoption of Remote Treatment and Recovery Services (048)

Principal Investigator(s): Tara Kunkel

J-RIG funding supports research into teleservice practices within Judicially Led Diversion Programs (JLDPs) since the pandemic. Judicially led diversion is an umbrella term that encompasses drug courts, opioid courts, and recovery-oriented compliance dockets. While these models differ in design, they share the common features of early intervention, supervision, consistent judicial oversight, and an emphasis on…

Learn More...

Connections Application for Recovery Engagement (CARE): Testing a Mobile App to Increase Recovery Engagement among Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System (047)

Principal Investigator(s): Jessica Hulsey

The success of digital therapeutics and telehealth are empirically well documented. What is less understood is what is needed to successfully adopt, sustain, and scale up these efforts in criminal justice settings to maximize both availability and effectiveness. Making evidence-based technology available to particularly vulnerable populations during the pandemic is important and justice-involved substance use…

Learn More...

Leveraging Social Networks to Increase COVID-19 Testing Uptake (046)

Principal Investigator(s): Kate Elkington

This study will research the efficacy and sustainability of a community-social network outreach model that partners infectious disease health providers with community-based organizations to successfully implement (reach, uptake, delivery and sustainment) COVID-19 point of service, rapid-testing among a highly vulnerable and often underserved population, those who use opioids and other substances. Two distinct social network…

Learn More...
Logo of New York State Psychiatric Institute and Logo of Columbia University

COVID-19 Testing and Prevention in Correctional Settings (045)

Principal Investigator(s): Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Emily Wang, Rosemarie Martin

Through the NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program, Yale University received a supplement to support a study to increase the reach, access, uptake, and impact of COVID-19 testing and to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 among incarcerated people and corrections staff. The initiative’s multidisciplinary team will be working with jails and prisons across Florida, Rhode Island, Minnesota, and Washington to address the urgent need for the development and implementation of long-term COVID-19 testing and prevention strategies. The long-term goal is to mitigate the impact of  COVID-19 in correctional facilities while considering the ethical issues that must be addressed to optimize implementation and effectiveness.

Learn More...
Logo of Yale School of Medicine

Community Network-Driven COVID-19 Testing of Vulnerable Populations in the Central US (044)

Principal Investigator(s): Harold Pollack, John Schneider, Mai Pho

The University of Chicago received a supplement from NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program to support the Community Network-Driven COVID-19 Testing of Vulnerable Populations in the Central US (C3) project to evaluate a COVID-19 testing approach that combines Social Network Testing Strategy (SNS) with community-developed public health messages. This study will focus on addressing misinformation, stigma, and distrust about COVID-19 testing and prevention among two populations that have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic: individuals involved in the criminal justice system that are not currently incarcerated and low-income Latinx individuals. The study will be conducted in rural and urban sites across Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Indiana, and Illinois. The goal of this study is to address challenges of current COVID-19 testing strategies which are limited by misinformation, stigma, distrust, and limited affirmation of ability to prevent COVID-19.

Learn More...
Logo of The University of Chicago

COVID-19 Mitigation Policies on Access to MOUD for Justice Involved Populations (043)

Principal Investigator(s): Rosemarie Martin

COVID-19 threatens to exacerbate the ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States, but the pandemic has also provided an opportunity to experiment with changes in how opioid treatment services are delivered around the country. The current pandemic has resulted in a flurry of unprecedented policy measures, and it is crucial to understand the impact that rapid changes in law, regulation, and policy are having on individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD), particularly those involved with the criminal justice system.

Learn More...
The logo of Brown University/

Addressing Risk Through Community Treatment for Infectious Disease and Opioid Use Disorder Now (ACTION) Among Justice-Involved Populations (042)

Principal Investigator(s): Kevin Knight, Sandra Springer, Ank Nijhawan

Improving HIV and Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) management and implementation for criminal justice (CJ)- involved individuals requires effective approaches to screening, linkage and adherence to integrated services across community agencies and service providers. Community reentry represents a critical opportunity to link individuals to HIV prevention and treatment and OUD service providers. In response, Yale University is conducting a effectiveness-implementation random control trial study to compare two models [Patient Navigation (PN) or Mobile Health Unit (MHU) service delivery] of linking individuals recently released from prison and jail to the continuum of community-based HIV and OUD prevention and treatment service cascades of care.

Learn More...
Logo of Yale School of Medicine

NIATx vs ECHO as Comparative Implementation Strategies (041)

Principal Investigator(s): Faye Taxman, Todd Molfenter

The trial will test two timely and successful evidence-based implementation practices, NIATx Coaching and Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO), with jail and community-based treatment providers to increase MOUD use with justice populations. NIATx Coaches provide expertise in MOUD implementation and organizational change to help treatment organizations and staff make, sustain, and spread MOUD. The ECHO platform focuses on the provider side by connecting primary care providers with expert MOUD prescribers to promote high-quality MOUD practices. This will be the first trial that assesses the comparative effectiveness of these approaches overall, and in justice settings.

Learn More...

Reducing Opioid Mortality in Illinois (040)

Principal Investigator(s): Harold Pollack, John Schneider, Mai Pho

This study is conducting a multi-site trial called ROMI (Reducing Opioid Mortality in Illinois) to study the effectiveness of case management approaches to link individuals with community-based treatment services upon release from jail. The ROMI intervention includes peer recovery coaches to improve linkages to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), supportive services, naloxone distribution, and harm reduction services for justice-involved individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD).

Learn More...
Logo of The University of Chicago

Using Implementation Interventions and Peer Recovery Support to Improve Opioid Treatment Outcomes in Community Supervision (039)

Principal Investigator(s): Damaris Rohsenow, Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Rosemarie Martin

This study will rigorously test a systems-change approach for increasing the use of medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) in seven community supervision sites in Rhode Island, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. The study uses facilitated local change teams consisting of justice and community service providers to develop and implement interorganizational linkage strategies.

Learn More...
The logo of Brown University/