Community Network-Driven COVID-19 Testing of Vulnerable Populations in the Central US (044)

The University of Chicago received a supplement from NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program to support the Community Network-Driven COVID-19 Testing of Vulnerable Populations in the Central US (C3) project to evaluate a COVID-19 testing approach that combines Social Network Testing Strategy (SNS) with community-developed public health messages. This study will focus on addressing misinformation, stigma, and distrust about COVID-19 testing and prevention among two populations that have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic: individuals involved in the criminal justice system that are not currently incarcerated and low-income Latinx individuals. The study will be conducted in rural and urban sites across Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Indiana, and Illinois. The goal of this study is to address challenges of current COVID-19 testing strategies which are limited by misinformation, stigma, distrust, and limited affirmation of ability to prevent COVID-19.

Read More

MOUD Access and Place-Based Policies (021)

Across the country, various public health interventions, opioid use policies, and criminal justice policies have emerged in response to the opioid epidemic in recent years. Many of the policies help improve access to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) and related services. However, the impact of improving access to these resources on health outcomes can vary substantially in different local contexts under various policies.

Read More

Predictive-analytic Models of Opioid Overdose and Reoffending (022)

The University of Chicago is developing open-source software that can be used by researchers and practitioners to predict overdose and re-offending risk of their population. This project will use large administrative datasets and machine-learning technology to develop a framework for transparent predictive models and simulations to help identify people at highest risk and how populations will benefit from interventions, and explore the likely policy impact of observed relationships among emerging trends to improve outcomes.

Read More

In Silico JCOIN Trial Models (018)

Computational analogues of the JCOIN clinical research centers, so called in silico clinical trials, in the form of data-driven, agent-based network models (ABNMs), can provide a variety of simulation-based analyses to investigate longer-term health outcomes beyond the clinical trial timelines. Building on the Justice-Community Circulation Model (JCCM), the University of Chicago will apply the JCCM framework to develop in silico versions of JCOIN’s clinical research trials to run computational trials such as optimizing cross-study combinations of interventions or tracking additional and emerging outcome.

Read More

Measuring Social and Spatial Inequities in Access to Opioid Use Disorder Treatment for Reducing HIV and HCV Transmissions (019)

Access to treatment and medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) is essential for reducing HIV and HCV transmissions. However, the spatial distribution of the resources for treatment and medication is a result of various social factors, which can include potential inequities.

To demonstrate the utility of a spatial perspective in evaluating access to MOUD resources, the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory will use a simulation approach to evaluate how treatment and intervention locations affect HIV and HCV transmissions.

Read More

Finding an Optimal Distance of Success: Measuring Access to Critical Resources in Opioid Use Disorder Justice Settings (020)

The University of Chicago is developing an agent-based network model (ABNM) framework to study location-specific evolution and dynamics of opioid use disorder (OUD) in justice settings. The Justice Community Circulation Model framework is designed to help researchers and practitioners explore underlying mechanisms, epidemiological processes and interactions, such as the health and mortality pathways of individuals who experience non-fatal overdose or who initiate treatment, among justice-involved individuals with OUD.

Read More

Justice-Community Circulation Model (017)

The University of Chicago is developing an agent-based network model (ABNM) framework to study location-specific evolution and dynamics of opioid use disorder (OUD) in justice settings. The Justice Community Circulation Model framework is designed to help researchers and practitioners explore underlying mechanisms, epidemiological processes and interactions, such as the health and mortality pathways of individuals who experience non-fatal overdose or who initiate treatment, among justice-involved individuals with OUD.

Read More

National Survey of Substance Use Services in US Jails (028)

Despite the effectiveness of medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD), there is a lack of information about what is currently available, accessible, and used throughout the jail and prison systems of the US. To better address this gap, the NORC at the University of Chicago will study how prisons and jails across 24 justictions are addressing opioid use disorder.

Read More

AmeriSpeak Brief Opioid Stigma Survey (026)

To assess how stigma changes overtime, the NORC at the University of Chicago is conducting a study to measure public support for opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment, assess stigma associated with OUD, and perceptions of criminality around OUD. This study will use a nationally representative survey panel and will administer short surveys twice a year for a total of five years. The data collected from this study will allow for a better understanding of the public’s opinion on issues related to OUD, stigma, and the justice system and how perceptions change over time.

Read More

AmeriSpeak in Depth Public Opinion Survey on Opioids (027)

The NORC at the University of Chicago is conducting a comprehensive study to measure the public’s view of policies, practices, attitudes and laws related to addressing opioids in justice settings across the U.S. This study builds on the topics from the JCOIN AmeriSpeak Brief Opioid Stigma Survey (026) and will also assess how support varies based on personal experiences with opioids or knowing someone who struggled with an OUD and variations by type of opioid and respondent characteristics.

Read More